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Economically Motivated Adulteration: Broadening the Focus to Food Fraud

FOOD FRAUD | August/September 2014



By John Spink, Ph.D.


This feature updates our October/November 2013 article “Economically Motivated Adulteration: Another Dimension of the ‘Expanding Umbrella of Food Defense,’”[1] which highlighted the global and holistic activities to prevent economically motivated adulteration (EMA), intentional adulteration and the broader concept of food fraud. While past articles focused on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) food defense activities,[1, 2] this article focuses on the impact of worldwide industry efforts. There is an increasing awareness that food fraud prevention will require a fundamentally different approach than for food safety and food defense. An evolution to a prevention-based approach has occurred in the past in fields from medicine to public health and law enforcement to crime prevention.




Our previous article started with “If not now, then when; if not us, then who?” 

While it may seem like not much has occurred in 9 months, agenc…
One of the most remarkable discoveries in modern archaeology: in 1850 a violent storm ravaged the Bay of Skaill in the Orkney Isles to the north-east of mainland Scotland, revealing the Neolithic village of Skara Brae buried beneath the sand dunes. It is the best preserved Neolithic village in northern Europe and it offers us a unique window into the lives of the farmers who lived there between 3,200 and 2,500 BC.



Skara Brae's remarkable survival through the ages is thanks to the design of the original builders who buried the stone-slab walls up to roof level in clay soil and waste material in order to provide insulation and protection from the elements.




Such a tightly knit and communal village life was unusual in these early farming communities, individual farmsteads being preferred, but Skara Brae seems to have been a very close community with little room for non-conformists. Every house has the same layout for roughly a family-sized living space (around 40 square metres).





Acces to…